Board Discusses Difference Between Supplemental Evidence and Information

Glucosamine & MSM labelingStill confused by the difference between supplemental evidence versus supplemental information? Let’s try this again….In Norman International, Inc. v. Andrew J. Toti Testamentary Trust, Russell L. Hinckley, Sr. (Co-Trustee) and Robert F. Miller (Co-Trustee), IPR2014-00283, the Board addressed an issue of admissibility of evidence, focusing on the differences between supplemental evidence and information.

Petitioner sought to have an exhibit (“Exhibit 1010”) admitted as supplemental information, pursuant to 37 CFR § 42.123(a). For the Board to authorize filing of a document under § 42.123(a), the moving party (Petitioner in this case) must prove that the documents are supplemental information, not supplemental evidence.  The difference between supplemental information and evidence, under precedent of Handi-Quilter, Inc. v. Bernina Int’l AG, IPR2013-00364, Paper 30 at 3 (PTAB June 12, 2014) is, as follows:

“supplemental evidence—served in response to an evidentiary objection and filed in response to a motion to exclude—is offered solely to support admissibility of the originally filed evidence and to defeat a motion to exclude that evidence, and not to support any argument on the merits (i.e., regarding the patentability or unpatentability of a claim). Supplemental information, on the other hand, is evidence a party intends to support an argument on the merits.”  Decision at 6.

Accordingly, Petitioner bore the burden of proving that Exhibit 1010 supported an argument on the merits for the exhibit to be admitted. Patent Owner opposed by arguing that Exhibit 1010 was served in response to Patent Owner’s evidentiary objection to a different exhibit (“Exhibit 1002”). Specifically, Patent Owner objected to Exhibit 1002 and alleged it lacked the required English translation and affidavit attesting to accuracy of translation, and therefore Patent Owner argued that Exhibit 1010 did nothing more than attempt to remedy the deficiencies in admissibility of Exhibit 1002.  Id. at 5-6.

The Board disagreed with Patent Owner, noting that Exhibit 1002 did contain an English translation, and Exhibit 1010 addressed whether that translation was accurate. Accordingly, the Board found that Exhibit 1010 essentially contained information about what Exhibit 1002 actually disclosed. Since Exhibit 1002 contained a reference which served as a basis for grounds of unpatentability (an argument on the merits), the Board found that Petitioner had met its burden of proving that Exhibit 1010 was supplemental information and therefore allowable. Id. at 7.